There’s something up in blog-ville

I just stumbled across the below paragraph in JohnsonBanks’ thought of the week: There’s something up in blog-ville:

Some of the original design blog stars are still there, like Swiss Miss, but the charm of observing the batty observations of a European in Manhattan are now regularly peppered with posts about it’s editor being featured here, or there, or speaking somewhere. But no-one can blame Tina Roth Eisenberg for turning her anonymity into some more marketable – she doubtless felt that years of posting about cool products had to lead somewhere, eventually, and her blog-fame may well help her design-fame. Maybe it makes sense to ‘monetize’ after all.

And funny enough, just last week, I had a conversation with two friend’s of mine about whether posting about my speaking engagements and press pieces could be damaging and upset my blog readers. Not sure how I feel now having come across this mention in JohnsonBanks much respected Thought of the week.

44 Comments leave a comment below

  1. Tina, blogging is a fantastic platform for sharing ideas, pointing to inspirations, and making your opinions known. When everyone and their dentist has a blog, it means a lot when your opinions and commentary are solicited for life outside the blogosphere. It’s something that many other bloggers can only hope for and the bloggers that do get this kind of attention are probably not as transparent as you are. Blogging is for being honest and being personal. I am reading your genuine excitement when you write about your features and speaking engagements. I think you’re doing great.

  2. Enjoy your success. I guess, that it’s okay to show off a little bit. Love your blogging and discoveries.

  3. I say go ahead and continue to self-promote. This is, after all, your blog, and we’re here to read your commentary as much as to see the goods themselves. The whole point of blogging is to make a connection with readers and with the community — and putting your name and face to it makes it that much more legit. There are anonymous blogs where the editors do their best to hide their identities, and those will always be around, but if we’re going for human engagement as much as visual data, we’ll feel fine reading about your life-events.

    PS, I do the same thing on my blog; I think everyone does, including Michael Banks.

  4. Oh, for pete’s sake. :) To be honest, I think that’s really silly. Your appearances are absolutely of interest to at least some of your audience. And speaking as part of the group who does scroll past — those two seconds here and there are NOT putting me out. :) I think your design blog is the perfect place to announce your design-related (and blog-related!) appearances. Just my two cents. :)

  5. I’m happy that so many have recognized your awesome tastes, but perhaps an appearances calendar in your global nav would help to clean things up.

    Keep at it, Swissmiss!

  6. Well as a reader i can say it’s not in any way distracting. As its creator, this site is an extension of you so why not mention what you’re up to from time to time?

  7. I can’t imagine a reader being upset because you’re posting about your speaking engagements and press. This is your blog and you can write about anything you want and I think it would be selfish of a reader to only expect and want you to post about “cool products” and nothing about your self.

    The way I see it is, I’m interested in the stuff you post and I’m also interested in the mind being it all.

    You’re doing great and good luck with the AIGA event. I wish I could make it.

  8. I think it was rather unfair and inaccurate of the writer to single you out. Your blog is just as interesting as it has always been. I come here to discover information and projects that I don’t find on other blogs, and that includes reading about your design related adventures in the “real world”.

    A much better example for the author would be the Gawker/Jezebel/Consumerist etc conglomerate. I visit those sites as well, but they are the ones whose corporate clout siphon readers away from smaller, more personal blogs.

  9. I agree with JohnsonBanks. The speaking engagements and award show jury posts come across as a bit self-centered and self-promoting. Of course it’s your site and you can do what you want and I’m certainly very happy for your success, but it strikes me as untoward when you flaunt it. It’s not why I read this blog.

  10. As a devoted reader in Vancouver, I’m unable to attend the events you mention so I don’t read about them. So what? I use a newsreader and pick the stories that interest me. I skip over many more stories on other blogs. I choose what to read.

    I think you should use this blog to discuss what you’re up to, be it what you find on design sites, what you’re working on or where you’re making appearances. There’s no shame in that and I’m sure that fans of yours in NYC appreciate it.

    Keep up the great work.

  11. I’m always amused when someone feels they can (or should) dictate what goes in a PERSONAL blog. Were this a business, or topic specific blog, they *might* have an argument, but really, this is YOUR blog, say what you want.

  12. I’d much rather read about speaking engagements, etc., than read blog entries and product mentions that have been paid for. Isn’t everyone on the internet skilled at skimming now anyway? Skip the stuff you don’t want to read.

  13. I’m scratching my head thinking wtf to his post. I’ve always enjoyed his blog but for this it seems way off base. If you can’t talk about yourself on a personal blog, where can you? Too bad comments are turned off on his blog…

  14. Hmm, I think the comment is overly harsh. I don’t see any blinking ads on your site. What’s wrong with tooting your own horn? Toot.

  15. SWISSMISS is all about guess who??….SWISSMISS!!! Shock horror!
    I’ts your blog so blog away about what you like, dislike, what makes you laugh, what makes you cry, what you are up to and what makes you tick.
    I for one absolutely love your blog and I check in every day so keep up the great work and don’t change a thing.

    :)

  16. i love when you post about your pursuits and speaking engagements and things like that. of course your readers want to know about that (if they don’t, they can skip over those posts), as it’s fascinating to follow someone’s life and amazing career. keep on doing what you’re doing, swiss!!! you rock!!! :)

  17. You should be the one deciding the content of your blog. If some readers don’t return only you can decide whether that’s a concern or not. Not being totally enamored with every item one reads on the internet is part of critical thinking.

    The fact that you were mentioned by name probably says more about your position in the design/blog community than anything else. I’m personally happy for any little snippet that demonstrates a writer’s personality/humanity. Your info to share as you see fit.

    phil

  18. I skip over the entries announcing your speaking engagements and such, cuz I live on an isolated campus you wouldn’t go near and I don’t get TV. It’s easy as pie to skim. Some blogs, like Cory Doctorow’s “Crap Hound,” contain nothing but promotion of projects… and that’s okay!

    One thing the author insinuates that no one’s really remarked on is that you started out blogging in order to get famous, et cetera. Just because this blog may have helped you reach your way to the top (personally I think the blame goes to Roller Boogie Audio Successory of the Day) doesn’t mean you had a secret little plan to convert your quality blog entries into cash.

    He also seems to treasure anonymity. “A European in Manhattan” becomes “the editor,” and for some reason that’s a bad thing. Well, what makes a blog good isn’t anonymity, it’s personality, and if we like your personality so much that we subscribe to your blog we are probably interested in hearing more of what you have to say! So please promote things that you are a part of, Tina, I would love to hear your speak one day if I’m in the area.

  19. personally, I’m fine with it.
    I don’t find it distracting or to much of self-promoting. This is your blog, and that’s a new part of your life. We love to hear about that.

    What I don’t like, and this hasn’t got anything to do with you blog, is when design bloggers, that used to be critical and edgy, suddenly turn into simple product promoters…

  20. Rarely post, but gonna chime in. I skip over your speaking engagements and “self-promotion” stuff, but it’s never bothered me in the slightest. I like this blog because graphic design pieces of the world are only just starting to interest me, and this blog does heaps to encourage that. Some of the stuff, including your “self-promotion” is more in-depth than interests me right now.
    I don’t care. It doesn’t bother me that a blog grows and changes. It happens. I still visit every day and find interesting things most days. That’s good enough for me. Don’t see why you shouldn’t post about things that relate to this world you work in just because you’re more involved.

  21. Don’t see the importance of you “hiding” your persona when the main thing about your blog is your personal taste, knowledge and experience…

  22. Ha. I am just one of your readers, but I feel like I have to say something to it. It is your blog after all, and I think you have all rights to write about yourself. :) “A designer has a design blog, and posts about her daily design life/inspiration and design career.” Sounds good to me! I even think you can post your current work with like, behind story or so. As your reader, it will possibly bug me if you start advertising stuffs not related to yourself, but even this would be up to you. Noone has a right to judge. Please keep it up!!!! :)

  23. I agree with most. Either learn to skim or shaddupaboutit. Lady, keep doing what younare doing. JB either just wants to rain on your parade, which isn’t even a parade, just absolutely sweet for you to invite us to things that matter to you. I believed you were singled out so JB could brag all Christmas about the day he put down a great contributor so he could have 15 minutes of fame and a tiny increase in page visits!

  24. To be honest last week I was thinking “Okay, another blog gone awry…” exactly because of the reasons now I read expressed by JB.

    The best solution, already suggested by other readers, would be to have a special section of the blog reserved for press pieces and engagements.

  25. Perhaps one way to look at it is that most of your readers came here and then stayed because of the posts you made about interesting things. Now those readers are interested in you and your speaking engagements too, but that’s because of the interesting posts you originally made.

    As long as the blog continues to offer that thing that got us all reading in the first place, i.e. the posts about design and Lovely Things In General, there’s no reason at all that you shouldn’t post about your speaking engagements too. Those who have become fans of your work I’m sure would love to attend if they could.

  26. You post cool stuff; I look at it; I return every day. That’s all there is to it. Does that writer have his degree certificate on a wall/photo of himself in a sports team/ or anything like that?

    Of course he does.

    As we say in England (a few of at least): what a misery-guts!

  27. Tina, I have been following you blog for a long time. I depend on it, it feeds me for inspiration. Every evening my husband, who doesn’t touch a computer (well, he would if it were made out of wood, he’s a fine furniture maker) asks “anything cool on SwissMiss today?

    now when someone’s blog is worked into a couples nightly rituals, you’re doing something right. I love hearing about your success, it is inspirational.

    Keep on bloggin’!

    C. + D.

  28. Tina,
    Mr Michael Johnson is self-publicist personified. you only need to look at his own blog to see that.

    Personally I want to know what you are doing and where, so that when I am stateside, one day our worlds may collide and there will be no stopping us then! …euro-girl power!
    Merry Christmas from the west country.

    PS Tell Michael to take a look in the mirror, swoosh back his dreamy locks and take the plank out of his own eye.

  29. Keep up the fantastic work Tina! We all look forward to what you post.

  30. I never felt bothered by any posting of yours, always light and charming. I have been following your blog for a while now and watching your progress was inspirational as another blogger put it. I believe it is normal if you capitalize on your success, it is something you have worked for and you deserve a reward for the hard work. I am almost sure that everybody else would have done the same. It is your blog, it is your decision and so far you have proved to have the right vision for it, so unless you are convinced of a need for change don’t do it. The fact you consulted your readers proves how much you care. Bon courage!

  31. you should decide this over a kick-ball game! seriously, your blog is awesome and its that way because of all the gut-instincts you have and write about. letting us readers know about speaking engagements only makes the experience more real and personal. much respect!

  32. It’s never changed the way I feel about your blog. It’s just a shame that others feel a need to rain on your parade.

  33. Wow! Thank you everyone for your encouraging comments. I truly appreciate it.

  34. I love your blog just the way it is. I wouldn’t change a thing. It is you being you. That, I ímagine, is the secret to your success. Updating your readers about upcoming speaking engagements keeps us in the loop, makes it more personal. I enjoy your posts and find them to be educational, inspirational or downright funny (that includes the updates). JB is correct about one thing, Blogville is a changin and we must all change with it. You are fab Swiss Miss in the big city!

  35. Hi,

    a) this is your blog
    b) if people like you and your blog they probably would be interested in hearing you speak
    c) are you are supposed to eat your blog?

    Putting a permanent promo on the sidebar may not be a bad idea either.

    ken

  36. Nothing wrong with mentioning your mentions with joy. People are too quick to judge others’ self-branding.

    You may wish, however, to create a separate category for these mentions so people who appreciate them can find them all in one place while others who don’t want your posts peppered with personal aggrandizement can have the meat without the bones.

  37. You are your site. I enjoy actually learning about who you are as much as I enjoy what you post. You rock.

  38. t, i have been following your blog over the years and we have become friends – there isn’t enough time in a day to communicate elsewhere about the cool and interesting things that are happening to you on a professional level so I personally look forward to reading about what you are up to via your blog —- it is your space and you have been dedicated to it for a very long time — there is no reason why it shouldn’t act as a platform for you to share speaking dates etc…

    your nyc readers shouldn’t complain – it is an easy way to find out where you are going to be :)

    keep it real yo :) xoj

  39. I’ve been reading your blog for ages now and absolutely love it! I think its good that you show what you’re doing and who you are. It’s also encouraging to see you enjoying recognition and success. The thing is, if you try to please everyone you end up pleasing nobody. So please yourself! I also think that if you are invited to speak at an event after becomming well known for writing your blog, mentioning it on your blog isn’t just the polite thing to do, it’s the nice thing to do. Have a great Christmas!

  40. no problem here. Keep up the good work. It is work after all.

  41. the beauty of of your blog is you – your observations and all the rest. i always look forward to visiting.

    ba humbug to the dude i’ve never heard of who claims your self promotion is ott.

    happy holidays to you and your family!
    c

  42. I tend to skip your posts about events because I can’t attend. I occasionally read them to know what people are talking about and gathering about in the design and creative community.

    I can’t imagine why anyone would think that a blog is declining because the blogger is posting about personal events and media. JB appears to be saying that using personal blog for talking about oneself is a sign of the a-blog-alypse. (Apparently, a financial meltdown isn’t enough for everyone.)

    Frankly, I am skeptical of a blogger who decries the end of his own medium. It sets his blog up as the “survivor blog who predicted the fall” while discrediting other quality blogs. Anyone can cry fire in a theatre, though. The tough part is building community to sustain everyone. From reading about some of your events, it sounds like you are more about sharing than tearing down.

    JB’s premise that personal blogs are becoming undone by corporate blogs/media are MORE of a reason why you should continue to blog about the events and kudos. Why? Because it reminds us that you are a Real Person(tm), putting your opinions out there, still posting a blog with a focus: eye-catching design.

    It also feeds the creative brains of other blogs (such as my own), creating a community of people still trying to raise their voice above the din. JB sideswipes the fact that bloggers HAVE to post about ourselves and where we are being featured because we need to be our own advocates for ourselves and our blog, giving some hope that real, individual voices still matter.

    Besides, did we not just show that the combined effort of millions of individual voices can defeat the corporate bullhorn back on November 4th?

    By posting your events, I also see that focused, quality blogging can lead to further opportunities to work with the topics I love. If those events, and posting about them, help you to pay the bills to keep the blog going, good. We are all better off for it.

    (There’s some thoughtful discussion for you, JB.)

  43. Tina, keep posting about you’re doing. Considering how much care and attention you put into this blog, you are more than welcome to devote posts to what you do when you aren’t blogging — especially when you’re continuing important conversations that need to happen in the real world

  44. Your blog is an output of your opinions and ideas. You do it because you enjoy it, so what is wrong with turning that enjoyment into a career boost? You put a lot of time and hard work into this blog to talk about other people’s accomplishments. There is no reason why you should withhold your own accomplishments from your own spotlight.

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