Honor

“To seek honor before profit is the surest means of finding profit with honor.”
– Félix Nadar

Photographer Félix Nadar on the Single Most Important Factor in Becoming a Commercially Successful Artist

The First Principles Method

“I think it’s important to reason from first principles rather than by analogy. The normal way we conduct our lives is we reason by analogy. [With analogy] we are doing this because it’s like something else that was done, or it is like what other people are doing. [With first principles] you boil things down to the most fundamental truths…and then reason up from there.”

How Elon Musk Thinks: The First Principles Method

Vivid Memorable Interactions

“… We can’t easily change the dominant narrative that people have about us, we certainly can’t do it by insisting that our customers or colleagues bring more nuance to the table.

​Instead, we can do it through action. Vivid, memorable interactions are what people remember. Surprises and vivid action matter far more than we imagine, and we regularly underinvest in them.”

The dominant narrative, by Seth Godin

James Corden Covered in Tattly

James CordenJames Corden

This made my week: James Corden modeled for WSJ covered in hundreds of Tattly. My heart nearly exploded when I discovered it. Not familiar with James Corden? He is the man behind the humorous and popular Carpool Karaoke!

High five!

“Strange how one person can saturate a room with vitality, with excitement. Then there are others… who can drain off energy and joy, can suck pleasure dry and get no sustenance from it. Such people spread a grayness in the air about them.”
– John Steinbeck

A quote found in this fantastic long read on Why, in the entire history of human life, did awesomeness become the great virtue of our age (and suckiness its vice)?, by Nick Riggle

(via Jocelyn)

Letting Go

“When you let go of something you are holding onto, you make room for your destiny to move in.

When you let go, you must have faith.

Have faith in the process, trust that you are going to a place you are meant for, a place that might not make sense now but will make plenty of sense later. You will see that because this happened, that happened. And the order of it all, no matter how painful or beautiful, was exactly what it needed to be.”

Why You Need to Let Go of Attachment, by Lewis Homes

We Are Hopelessly Hooked

“For young people, she observes, the art of friendship is increasingly the art of dividing your attention successfully. Speaking to someone who isn’t fully present is irritating, but it’s increasingly the norm.”

We are hopelessly hooked, by Jacob Weisberg

(via)

Emphasize Values over Rules

“You need to have some boundaries for kids. They can’t be allowed to do whatever they want, but in these families that mention creativity, the emphasis was not on, “This is what you do because I say so,” it was, “These are principles that we believe in and here’s why we think they’re important. What do you think? Let’s have a discussion about that.” There was reflective dialogue going on. Because of that, kids took ownership of the values and essentially made some of the very rules that the less creative parents were busy trying to enforce. Instead of enforcing them, these few parents got their creative children to endorse the rules themselves because they helped to generate them.”
– Adam Grant

The above excerpt is from an article by Eric Baker titled How To Be A Better Parent: 4 Secrets Backed By Research. I assume this probably also applies to the work place?

Over-compensate to compensate

derek sivers

As someone who is currently navigating through some major change this article by Derek Sivers made me think. In order to create real change in our behaviour we need to move more than ‘just one brick’. But if we move all of them we’re unbalanced. He beautifully illustrates what the right amount of ‘moving bricks is’. Read the article here: Over-compensate to compensate.

The Value of Trauma

Self-development is often portrayed as a rosy, flowery progression from dumbass to enlightenment that involves a lot of joy, prancing in fields of daisies, and high-fiving two thousand people at a seminar you paid way too much to be at.

But the truth is that transitions between the life stages are usually triggered by trauma or an extreme negative event in one’s life. A near-death experience. A divorce. A failed friendship or a death of a loved one.

Trauma causes us to step back and re-evaluate our deepest motivations and decisions. It allows us to reflect on whether our strategies to pursue happiness are actually working well or not.

How to move through the four stages of life, by Mark Manson.

(via Jocelyn)

“Verschlimmbessern”

25. Verschlimmbessern (German): To accidentally make something worse in the process of attempting to mend or improve it. Multiple applications around computers, cake baking and relationships.

From this fascinating list of Untranslatable Words.

Fundamental Principles for Overcoming Worry

31. Live in “day-tight compartments.”

32. How to face trouble:

a. Ask yourself, “What is the worst that can possibly happen?”

b. Prepare to accept the worst.

c. Try to improve on the worst.

33. Remind yourself of the exorbitant price you can pay for worry in terms of your health.

This post is full of gems: How to Overcome Worry and Be a Friendlier Person

Can I Pick Your Brain?

1. Picking someone’s brain sounds like an entirely one-sided appeal.
2. There’s no such thing as a 15 minute call, or coffee, or meeting with someone you don’t really know.
3. Offer to come to them.

A few words of advice to brain pickers, by Jason Fried

Start As Amateurs

“Very few people have the humility to start as amateurs. They procrastinate doing the work they want in the name of perfectionism. You know these people. The one’s who have been saying for years that they’re going to do something but never do. Yet inwardly, they’re terrified of what other people will think of them. They’re caught in a state of paralysis by analysis — too busy calculating and never reaching a state of flow. Rather than doing work their own way, they do what they think will be well-received — being merely imitators of what is already popular.”

How to Become the Best in the World at What You Do, By Benjamin Hardy

Hi…


Frank Chimero is brilliant: Hi, I’d Like To Add Myself to The New Yorker

No!

“Time is the raw material of creation.”

Creative People Say No, by Kevin Ashton

What are you Willing to Struggle For?

“Who you are is defined by the values you are willing to struggle for. People who enjoy the struggles of a gym are the ones who get in good shape. People who enjoy long workweeks and the politics of the corporate ladder are the ones who move up it. People who enjoy the stresses and uncertainty of the starving artist lifestyle are ultimately the ones who live it and make it.”

You probably know to ask yourself, “What do I want?” Here’s a way better question, by Mark Manson

Being a Grown Up

A few weeks ago I asked the following question:

My wonderful friend Jocelyn K. Glei responded with a thoughtful post. Here’s an excerpt:

“When the going gets rough in any creative or entrepreneurial project, what we require isn’t reason or rationality, it’s sheer tenacity—commitment to our abilities, commitment to our process, commitment to finishing even in the face of the inevitable setbacks. This is what separates children from the adults, and the Peter Pans from the Pros.

If being grown up means being committed—to a business, a project, a person—then it’s impossible to peak. And the deeper the commitment, the deeper the meaning that can emerge.”

Read the full post: What Separates the Peter Pans from the Pros

The Impostor Syndrome

The Impostor Syndrome

Good read: Learning to Deal With the Impostor Syndrome, by Carl Richards

Radical Candor

Radical Candor

HHIPP: “Radical candor is humble, it’s helpful, it’s immediate, it’s in person — in private if it’s criticism and in public if it’s praise — and it doesn’t personalize.”

Fantastic read: Radical Candor — The Surprising Secret to Being a Good Boss

(via Cindy)

Freunde von Freunden

Freunde von Freunden

I am thrilled (and a bit stunned) that my ‘world’ is featured on Freunde von Freunden. A big thank you to Shoko Wanger and Nicole Franzen.

Reconsider

“Part of the problem seems to be that nobody these days is content to merely put their dent in the universe. No, they have to f***ing own the universe. It’s not enough to be in the market, they have to dominate it. It’s not enough to serve customers, they have to capture them.”

Fantastic (long) ready: Reconsider, by David Heinemeier Hansson.

Absence

“It seems that the presence of an object is required to make its absence felt (or to make the absence of something felt). A kind of longing may have preceded their arrival, but you have to meet in order to feel the full force of your frustration in their absence.”
– Adrienne Rich

Why We Fall in Love, over on brainpickings

The Secret to a Successful Network

Based on a decade of research developing detailed case studies on a range of successful networks, the authors of this article have identified a common pattern of factors that are essential to effective collaboration.

– focus on mission before organization;
– manage through trust, not control;
– promote others, not yourself;
– and build constellations, not stars.

Four Network Principles for Collaboration Success, by Jane Wei-Skillern

(via William Ury)