Brandord Marsalis on Students

From this article: 3 Things School taught you without even realizing it.

(via)

How to Raise a Creative Child

“Creativity may be hard to nurture, but it’s easy to thwart. By limiting rules, parents encouraged their children to think for themselves. They tended to “place emphasis on moral values, rather than on specific rules,” the Harvard psychologist Teresa Amabile reports.”

How to Raise a Creative Child. Step One: Back Off, by Adam Grant

On Measuring

“What gets measured gets managed.”
– Peter Drucker

A quote found in this blog post. (via)

Sorry For The Delayed Response

“O.K., so it’s taken me two weeks to get back to you, and I have no excuse beyond the fact that I just didn’t care about your thing. I still don’t care, but I’m trying to foster a false sense of productivity by cleaning out my inbox. Please don’t respond to this response and undo my hard work! Looping in Laura, in case you feel that you have to write to someone.”

Sorry For The Delayed Response, by Susanna Wolff

Northern Exposure

Loving how Evgenia Arbugaeva captured these impressive Alaskan women fishing in extreme environments. Discovered them in this Vogue Article.

Friendship

“The surprising finding is that the closest, most intimate, and most trusting relationships appear to be distinguished not by how the partners respond to each other’s disappointments, losses, and reversals but how they react to good news.”

– The Myths of Happiness

A quote found in this article titled: This Is How To Make Friends As An Adult: 5 Secrets Backed By Research

Reclaim Your Creative Confidence

“Schedule daily “white space” in your calendar, where your only task is to think or take a walk and daydream. When you try to generate ideas, shoot for 100 instead of 10. Defer your own judgment and you’ll be surprised at how many ideas you have—and like—by the end of the week.”

Reclaim Your Creative Confidence, by Tom Kelley and David Kelley

… and it bends toward justice

“… It’s taken us 100,000 years to figure out that we are only as well off as the weakest ones in our tribe, and that connection and community and respect lead to a world that benefits everyone.

The irony of Dr. King’s holiday is that he surely believed that anyone could take on this calling, that anyone could organize, speak up and stand for justice.

We can connect, we can publish, we can lead. Anyone reading this has the ability to care, and to do something about it. We have more power than we dare imagine.

And so it bends.”

… and it bends toward justice, by Seth Godin

Productivity in Terrible Times

“When a solid 67% of your soul is engaged with battles elsewhere, how do you continue on with our ongoing, non-revolutionary work?”

Productivity in Terrible Times, by Eileen Webb

(via my favorite newsletter)

Tolerations

“One of the things I focus on most when trying to reduce the anxiety in my own home is something called tolerations. Tolerations are things that need attention: shoes that need to be resoled, a drawer handle that is coming loose, a pile of bills that needs to be paid.”

Ways to reduce anxiety in your home through design, by Ingrid Fetell Lee

Teenager Tribe Memberships

“I can’t overstate the significance of a teenager’s tribe membership,” Damour writes. “Teenagers aren’t just looking to make friends, they are replacing the family they have withdrawn from (or at least might barely acknowledge in public) with a tribe they can feel proud to call their own.”

There is a psychological term for that thing mean girls do to each other, by Jenny Anderson

George Michael on the Media

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George Michael in 1990 describing the role of the media in manipulating people into cruelty and lack of compassion.

(via Sarah Kendzior)

Calm

“We should spare ourselves the burden of loneliness. We are far from the only ones with this problem. Everyone is more anxious than they are inclined to tell us. Even the tycoon and the couple in love are suffering. We’ve collectively failed to admit to ourselves what we are truly like.”

A long and interesting read: Calm by Alan de Botton

Affirm and Lift Up

“People are complicated… Societies and cultures are really complicated… These are living organisms, and it’s messy. And your job as a citizen and as a decent human being is to constantly affirm and lift up and fight for treating people with kindness and respect and understanding.”
– Barack Obama

From this New Yorker piece by David Remnik.

(via)

No Place for Self-Pity

“This is precisely the time when artists go to work. There is no time for despair, no place for self-pity, no need for silence, no room for fear. We speak, we write, we do language. That is how civilizations heal.

I know the world is bruised and bleeding, and though it is important not to ignore its pain, it is also critical to refuse to succumb to its malevolence. Like failure, chaos contains information that can lead to knowledge — even wisdom. Like art.”

– Toni Morrison

No Place for Self-Pity, No Room for Fear: Toni Morrison on the Artist’s Task in Troubled Times

Mannequin Challenge

“Groups of people are gathering and freezing themselves in place, often in elaborate poses and scenarios, as one camera-toting person walks through the scene to zoom in on the details. As is often the case, teenagers are leading the way.”

Mannequin Challenge Is the New Viral Video Sensation You Probably Can’t Avoid

Live Immediately

“Putting things off is the biggest waste of life: it snatches away each day as it comes, and denies us the present by promising the future. The greatest obstacle to living is expectancy, which hangs upon tomorrow and loses today. You are arranging what lies in Fortune’s control, and abandoning what lies in yours. What are you looking at? To what goal are you straining? The whole future lies in uncertainty: live immediately.”
– Seneca

The Shortness of Life: Seneca on Busyness and the Art of Living Wide Rather Than Living Long

Negative Emotions and The Creative Process

“Rigor is the key to overcoming obstacles and completing tasks—and good mood doesn’t improve problem-solving, which involves judgments that almost by necessity won’t feel good: critique and evaluation, experimentation and failure. The stress that arises from problems may be unpleasant but it also motivates us to complete tasks, Davis says. In other words, negative emotions are actually beneficial to the creative process.”

Scientists explain how happiness makes us less creative

Climb That Mountain

The fact is: sometimes you just have to do things for no other reason than to do them. Do them because you can. Because they exist. As George Mallory said when asked why he wanted to climb Mt. Everest: “Because it’s there.”

3 important life skills nobody ever taught you.

(via my favorite newsletter)

Vacationing Is Good For You

“Before you can go to the Bahamas for a week, don’t you first need to learn how to tolerate an entire elevator ride without checking your email?”

This Slate article explains why we need to take more vacation and offers examples of how some companies get more of their employees to do so. Definitely something you don’t need to teach the Swiss, but seems to be the case here in the US.


(via Josh Spector’s newsletter)

How China Is Changing Your Internet

What was once known as the land of cheap rip-offs may now offer a glimpse of the future — and American companies are taking notice: Chinese Tech Firms Forced to Choose Market: Home or Everywhere Else

The Power of Trust

“…It’s really powerful to vocalize what’s going on inside your head to someone who you know is listening to you and to know that it’s a safe enough space that you can test out dumb ideas or mistakes, and analyze them, and they’re not going to hold them against you.”

Productivity and the Power of Trust

To-Do List Make Over

“One of the reasons that so many of the tasks on our to-do lists end up woefully undone is because we have to go to meetings, and we have to do email; they create their own urgency. But if you want to make sure that you regularly accomplish meaningful work—the type of work that helps you advance your career, push forward important projects, or expand your skill set—you have to make time for it. (Productivity guru Stephen Covey calls this putting the “big rocks” in first.)

It so obvious yet I have never done it, but carving out time for ‘meaningful work’ is the first thing I’ll start doing after reading this article by Jocelyn G. Klei.

Go MailChimp!

“It’s possible to create a huge tech company without taking venture capital, and without spending far beyond your means. It’s possible, in other words, to start a tech company that runs more like a normal business than a debt-fueled rocket ship careening out of control. Believe it or not, start-ups don’t even have to be headquartered in San Francisco or Silicon Valley.”

MailChimp and the Un-Silicon Valley Way to Make It as a Start-Up, by Farhad Manjoo