The Train That Never Stops

The Train That Never Stops

The above video (note: it’s in Taiwanese), demonstrates a rather interesting concept by Taiwanese inventor Peng Yu-Lun for a train that never stops. He correctly points out that trains would be far more efficient (and on-time) if they didn’t have to go through the trouble of, you know, stopping to pick up passengers, Unfortunately, at present not stopping for passengers would mean, well, no passengers. Yu-Lun’s design solves that problem with a kind of “top-mounted boarding shuttle that is scooped up when the train passes one station and automatically deposited when it reaches the next stop.” See the video to get a better sense of how it would work.

(via trehugger)

9 Comments leave a comment below

  1. This is actually in Chinese.

  2. What if you don’t want to get off at that stop? Would they have different compartments for every future stop? Or are passengers somehow able to get to the lower level from those movable upper levels, thereby allowing them to go back up top as their stop approaches?

  3. Love the re-think that goes into this idea. Hope they do work at it and it would surely be refreshing to see it in real life.

    Thanks for sharing.

  4. I recently took a 6 hours train trip and I think I would have enjoyed this very much. There were too many stops… Thank god for engineers!

  5. Brilliant !!! it will save a lot of time

  6. This is a great idea! A brilliant start but needs to be polished as various issues arise.

    - Speed of main train would be at a constant level but slower than a bullet train or shinkansen.

    - Looks like 1 or 2 top hubs allowed for each satellite station. Prevent accidental pile up of hubs in 1 area.

    - It seems like its a one ride, one stop and fixed range.

    many more…

    k
    http://www.jeanculture.com
    Designer Jeans Source. Denim Brand Database.

  7. Dear Swissmiss,

    You said that the video is in “Taiwanese.”

    That was not quite correct.

    In fact it is in “Putonghua” aka, “Mandarin.”

    Also, referring to the Minan or Hokkien dialect as “Taiwanese” is both inaccurate and Chauvinistic.

    It is inaccurate because the Minan or Hokkien dialect is spoken by far more people on the Chinese mainland than on Taiwan. Only 16 million people on the Province of Taiwan speak it, whereas 33 million, or over twice as many speak it in the Province of Fujian on the Chinese mainland.

    It is Chauvinistic because implies that Aborigines, Hakkas, and other minorities on Taiwan are NOT “Taiwanese” and do not speak “Taiwanese.”

    It would be akin to referring to Schweizerdeutsch as “Swiss.” That would imply that other languages spoken in Switzerland were “NOT Swiss” and that their speakers were “NOT Swiss.”

    Obviously that was not your intention. But it is often the intention of many on Taiwan.

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