Call Paul

Such a pleasure to be in conversation with Paul Jarvis on his podcast Call Paul talking about how this moment in time has affected me personally and my various businesses.

Towards a Moral Revolution

“One of the biggest lessons of my life, Krista, has been that we can’t separate the world into monsters and angels and that there’s nothing like loving people and knowing friends who played different roles in the genocide, including being perpetrators, that makes you have to confront that most raw element of what it means to be human. And the only conclusion I could make was that there are monsters and angels in each of us and that those monsters really are our broken parts — they’re our insecurities; they’re our fears; they’re our shames — and that in times of insecurity, it becomes really easy for demagogues to prey on those broken parts and sometimes make us do terrible things to each other.

We’re seeing that all over the world right now. And we have to fight against that. And that’s where the moral revolution becomes a matter of whether we choose to dive into the dark, the perilous path, or whether we choose to create a narrative and make that narrative real, which is our shared destiny, the possibility of collective human flourishment, our repairing the Earth in ways that make it more beautiful — and the choice is ours. And so my hard-edged hope comes from having lived and worked in communities that have had to contend with both. And like flowers breaking through granite, I’m gonna choose hope every time. And I frankly — despite all the dark, I remain a stubborn, persistent, hard-edged, hopeful optimist. I do!”

This is an excerpt of a conversation between Jacqueline Novogratz and Krista Tippett in the most recent episode of the wonderful On Being podcast. Listening to this episode is what my heart needed today.

OK Go | All Together Now

What a moving letter that came with this new OK Go song. Read it here.

The Missing Sounds of New York

OMG I love this so much: The NYPL has released an album of sound-based experiences that you might be missing right now as we all shelter at home: Missing Sounds of New York.

(via Kottke)

Color Is A Beautiful Thing

(via The Curious Brain)

The Importance of Uncertainty

“I think it’s so easy to extrapolate from this moment as if we know what’s going to happen in a week, or a month, or three months, or six months, or a year. And this is one of those situations. The Buddha was always talking about it, of the importance of uncertainty. That really, we don’t know what the next moment is going to bring.”
Mark Epstein

A Bit of Relief: I Forgive You, New York

This love letter to NYC deeply touched me.

You Can’t Always Get What You Want

As part of the One World: Together at Home fundraiser members of the Rolling Stones, each in their own home, got together via video to perform You Can’t Always Get What You Want.

My favorite part of all this is that we get glimpses into people’s homes.

Radio Garden

Radio Garden is an incredibly delightful website: It presents you with a spinnable globe of the Earth, with each green dot representing a radio station. Rotate the globe, click a dot and you are suddenly listening to live radio in that part of the world. I am currently listening to a station in WeeWaa, Australia. I love the internet!

(via Recommendo)

Together Apart

Priya Parker launched a podcast, Together Apart, in collaboration with The New York Times. If there is one voice I want to hear from, about the meaning of gathering in this unusual time, it is Priya.

About this episode: A woman who has been gathering for Passover Seder with over 40 people for 40 years wants to know how to celebrate digitally without losing the intimacy. Priya helps her design a meaningful digital gathering by exploring one of the most important questions from the Passover tradition — what makes this night different from all other nights?

If you haven’t read Priya’s book, The Art of Gathering, I highly recommend.

Bill Withers



(via)

Andrà Tutto Bene

(Thank you Libby)

The Case of the Missing Hit

This latest Reply All episode is *delightful*. It’s about a man in California who is haunted by the memory of a pop song from his youth. He can remember the lyrics and the melody. But the song itself has vanished, completely scrubbed from the internet. PJ takes on the Super Tech Support case.

Always Coming Back To This One

My favorite. Of all time.

Kodo

My latest obsession: Kodo – Japanese Drummers. I have their albums on repeat on Spotify. Talk about energizing. I am determined to see them perform live.

Lenny Kravitz – Again

I have rediscovered Again by Lenny Kravitz. Playing on repeat. So good.

Design Matters: Jessica Hische

“Living unapologetically… You don’t have to apologize because you want to live your life a certain way.”
— Jessica Hische

(via Design Matters with Jessica Hische)

Brené Brown — Strong Back, Soft Front, Wild Heart

Brené Brown says our belonging to each other can’t be lost, but it can be forgotten. Her research has reminded the world in recent years of the uncomfortable, life-giving link between vulnerability and courage. Now she’s turning her attention to how we walked into the crisis of our life together and how we can move beyond it: with strong backs, soft fronts, and wild hearts.

Are You Satisfiable?

On my walk home from work yesterday, I listened to the most recent Hurry Slowly episode. It completely stopped me in my tracks, to the point where I would catch myself standing on a street corner, completely immersed. The minute I came home, I sat down on my couch and started the episode right over again, taking in all of Adrienne Maree Brown’s thoughtfulness and questions. Are you satisfiable? What does it mean to be satisfiable? How do you recognize when you have “enough”? Questions central not just to our own well-being but to attaining a more just and equitable society. Have a listen, it’s nourishing and thought-provoking.

Marble Machine

This is pretty magical.

First Things First

One of the only Podcast Interviews I did this year just went live. Thank you for having me, Paddy Harrington. You got me to dig deep.

I am “A Too Much” Woman

“There she is. . . the “too much” woman. The one who loves too hard, feels too deeply, asks too often, desires too much.

There she is taking up too much space, with her laughter, her curves, her honesty, her sexuality. Her presence is as tall as a tree, as wide as a mountain. Her energy occupies every crevice of the room. Too much space she takes.

There she is causing a ruckus with her persistent wanting, too much wanting. She desires a lot, wants everything—too much happiness, too much alone time, too much pleasure. She’ll go through brimstone, murky river, and hellfire to get it. She’ll risk all to quell the longings of her heart and body. This makes her dangerous.

She is dangerous.

And there she goes, that “too much” woman, making people think too much, feel too much, swoon too much. She with her authentic prose and a self-assuredness in the way she carries herself. She with her belly laughs and her insatiable appetite and her proneness to fiery passion. All eyes on her, thinking she’s hot shit.

Oh, that “too much” woman. . . too loud, too vibrant, too honest, too emotional, too smart, too intense, too pretty, too difficult, too sensitive, too wild, too intimidating, too successful, too fat, too strong, too political, too joyous, too needy—too much.

She should simmer down a bit, be taken down a couple notches. Someone should put her back in a more respectable place. Someone should tell her.

Here I am. . . a Too Much Woman, with my too-tender heart and my too-much emotions.
A hedonist, feminist, pleasure seeker, empath. I want a lot—justice, sincerity, spaciousness, ease, intimacy, actualization, respect, to be seen, to be understood, your undivided attention, and all of your promises to be kept.

I’ve been called high maintenance because I want what I want, and intimidating because of the space I occupy. I’ve been called selfish because I am self-loving. I’ve been called a witch because I know how to heal myself.

And still. . . I rise.”

— Ev’Yan Whitney

Design Matters: Malcolm Gladwell

In this Design Matters episode Malcolm Gladwell discusses his new book, “Talking to Strangers”—and how we default to truth … but not necessarily the whole truth.

No one does interviews better than Debbie Millman. No one.

Virtual Choir

Composer Eric Whitacre started the Virtual Choir; an experiment that connects singers from every corner of the globe. What a moving experiment. Love everything about this.