How to use Gmail More Efficiently

I am fascinated by this step by step guide on how to use Gmail more efficiently. Thank you Andreas Klinger for taking the time to write down your process.

David Hieatt in Conversation with Mark Guiness

“When I see people who don’t care about or don’t have pride in what they do, I need to get out of that building because I just can’t do it. So anyway, the next day, I went and spent £460 on floor paint, and the entire company painted the floor. And actually, that point was a really important point in the factory, and the team because actually, we all decided at that point, you know what, we didn’t want to be average, and the enemy was to be average. And actually, we all enjoyed painting the floor. And actually when we moved to the new building, a new factory, we’re all going to paint the floor again because I think that was the point where we became a team.”

This week’s guest on the 21st Century Creative podcast is David Hieatt, entrepreneur, author, speaker and founder of The Do Lectures. A solid citizen and human I admire tremendously. Listen to the podcast here.

Chris Savage of Wistia

“Having money in the bank gave us something more powerful than VC money or runway.

It gave us “profitable confidence.””

Fantastic Twitter Thread by Wistia CEO Chris Savage

Rediscovering My Daughter Through Instagram

“Social media has been blamed for ruining our democracy, shortening our children’s attention spans and undermining the fabric of society. But through it, I was able to be with Paulina out in the world again, to see what she sees, to virtually stand beside her and witness the people and places she moves through, in nearly real time. Not in a parent-policing role, but in a wonderful-world sort of way.”

Rediscovering My Daughter Through Instagram, by Helene Stapinski

Leading From The Heart

“Without self-awareness and the ability to manage our emotions, we often unknowingly lead from hurt, not heart. Not only is this a huge energy suck for us and the people around us, it creates distrust, disengagement, and an eggshell culture.”
— Brené Brown

Leading from Hurt Versus Leading from Heart

Aphorisms on Kindness

“We can be kind and successful, kind and exciting, kind and wealthy and kind and potent. Kindness is a virtue awaiting our rediscovery and our renewed, un-conflicted appreciation.”
Aphorisms on Kindness

The Simple Joy of “No Phones Allowed”

“Every time someone in a group of people deploys a screen, the whole group is affected. Each disengaged person in a crowd is like a little black hole, a dead zone for social energy, radiating a noticeable field of apathy towards the rest of the room and what’s happening there.”

Read the full post: The Simple Joy of “No Phones Allowed”

(via Hurry Slowly)

A Humanistic Enterprise

“I believe in a humanistic enterprise: business should comply in the noblest manner with all the rules of ethics that man has devised over the centuries. I dream about a form of humanistic modern capitalism with strong ancient roots, where profit is made without harm or offence to anyone, and part of it is set aside for any initiative that can really improve the condition of human life: services, schools, places of worship and cultural heritage.”

Bruno Cucinelli

(via Jason)

Purpose of Capitalism

“The purpose of capitalism is to allow our society to become better. A culture that opens doors for and nurtures the people we care about.

The issues of our time are education, corruption, access, infrastructure, civility and the downstream effects of the work we do.”

Seth Godin

Grief

“I have learned that Grief is a force of energy that cannot be controlled or predicted. It comes and goes on its own schedule. Grief does not obey your plans, or your wishes. Grief will do whatever it wants to you, whenever it wants to. In that regard, Grief has a lot in common with Love.

The only way that I can “handle” Grief, then, is the same way that I “handle” Love — by not “handling” it. By bowing down before its power, in complete humility.

When Grief comes to visit me, it’s like being visited by a tsunami. I am given just enough warning to say, “Oh my god, this is happening RIGHT NOW,” and then I drop to the floor on my knees and let it rock me. How do you survive the tsunami of Grief? By being willing to experience it, without resistance.”

Elizabeth Gilbert on Love, Loss, and How to Move Through Grief as Grief Moves Through You

Chiune Sugihara and Moral Heroism

“Day and night he wrote visas. He issued as many visas in a day as would normally be issued in a month. His wife, Yukiko, massaged his hands at night, aching from the constant effort. When Japan finally closed down the embassy in September 1940, he took the stationery with him and continued to write visas that had no legal standing but worked because of the seal of the government and his name. At least 6,000 visas were issued for people to travel through Japan to other destinations, and in many cases entire families traveled on a single visa. It has been estimated that over 40,000 people are alive today because of this one man.”

The Japanese Man Who Saved 6,000 Jews With His Handwriting

Nobody-But-Yourself

“A lot of people think or believe or know they feel — but that’s thinking or believing or knowing; not feeling. And poetry is feeling — not knowing or believing or thinking.

Almost anybody can learn to think or believe or know, but not a single human being can be taught to feel. Why? Because whenever you think or you believe or you know, you’re a lot of other people: but the moment you feel, you’re nobody-but-yourself.

To be nobody-but-yourself — in a world which is doing its best, night and day, to make you everybody else — means to fight the hardest battle which any human being can fight; and never stop fighting.”

E. E. Cummings

Enormous Smallness: The Sweet Illustrated Story of E. E. Cummings and His Creative Bravery

Contemporary Loneliness

“I feel like so much of contemporary loneliness in motion is this compulsion to share my web browser. It’s like there’s a way of aesthetically stating your browser, which is kind of where you move and how you look and what you see. Even just breaking it up into close shots and long shots, and like what’s at the center. It’s not about a golden mean, but it’s a signature as poetry—which is how I see and how I move and what stops me—and putting them together.”

Eileen Myles on writing and social media

Fundamentals of Team

01 Radical Honesty.
02 Kill The Ego.
03 Clear Purpose.
04 A Safe Place.
05 Never Settle.
06 Follow Through.
07 O Captain. My Captain
08 Change a little. Change a lot.
09 If You Fail, I Fail.
10 Walk + Talk.
11 We Have Enough Of Your Time.
12 Fun.

Read the full Do Lectures post here: Fundamentals of Team

Community Management

“A garden needs both fertilizer and weedkiller. But most of all it needs a gardener. Go back in and participate as much as before. Community manage with a heavy hand. Promote good people, respond to them. Make them shine. Build good admin tools to silence bad actors.”
Caterina Fake

A Sense of Appreciation

“The more practice you give your brain at feeling and expressing gratitude, the more it adapts to this mind-set — you could even think of your brain as having a sort of gratitude “muscle” that can be exercised and strengthened. If this is right, the more of an effort you make to feel gratitude one day, the more the feeling will come to you spontaneously in the future. It also potentially helps explain another established finding, that gratitude can spiral: The more thankful we feel, the more likely we are to act pro-socially toward others, causing them to feel grateful and setting up a beautiful virtuous cascade.”
– Christian Jarrett

Found in this article: Sense of Appreciation Is the Single Most Sustainable Motivator at Work

The Power of Positive People

“Your group of friends are better than any drug or anti-aging supplement, and will do more for you than just about anything.”

The Power of Positive People, by Tara Parker-Pope

On Recycling Plastic

“Recycling plastic is to saving the Earth what hammering a nail is to halting a falling skyscraper. You struggle to find a place to do it and feel pleased when you succeed. But your effort is wholly inadequate and distracts from the real problem of why the building is collapsing in the first place. The real problem is that single-use plastic—the very idea of producing plastic items like grocery bags, which we use for an average of 12 minutes but can persist in the environment for half a millennium—is an incredibly reckless abuse of technology.”

More Recycling Won’t Solve Plastic Pollution

(via Paul)

How To Grow Old

“Make your interests gradually wider and more impersonal, until bit by bit the walls of the ego recede, and your life becomes increasingly merged in the universal life. An individual human existence should be like a river — small at first, narrowly contained within its banks, and rushing passionately past rocks and over waterfalls. Gradually the river grows wider, the banks recede, the waters flow more quietly, and in the end, without any visible break, they become merged in the sea, and painlessly lose their individual being.”

Bertrand Russell on What Makes a Fulfilling Life

How the Web Was Lost

“As public outrage grows over the centralization of the Web, and as enlarging numbers of coders join the effort to decentralize it, he has visions of the rest of us rising up and joining him. This spring, he issued a call to arms, of sorts, to the digital public. In an open letter published on his foundation’s Web site, he wrote: “While the problems facing the web are complex and large, I think we should see them as bugs: problems with existing code and software systems that have been created by people—and can be fixed by people.”

When asked what ordinary people can do, Berners-Lee replied, “You don’t have to have any coding skills. You just have to have a heart to decide enough is enough. Get out your Magic Marker and your signboard and your broomstick. And go out on the streets.” In other words, it’s time to rise against the machines.”

“I was devastated”: Tim Berners-Lee, the man who created the world wide web, has some regrets

(Thank you Manu)

Mean People Fail

“There is also a complementary force at work: if you want to build great things, it helps to be driven by a spirit of benevolence. The startup founders who end up richest are not the ones driven by money. The ones driven by money take the big acquisition offer that nearly every successful startup gets en route. The ones who keep going are driven by something else. They may not say so explicitly, but they’re usually trying to improve the world. Which means people with a desire to improve the world have a natural advantage.”

Mean People Fail, by Paul Graham from 2014

(Thanks Paul)

How many people do you need to change the world?

How many social activists does it take to change the world? No, this isn’t the setup for some lame joke. It’s a question no one really knew the answer to. Until now.

Marcus Aurelius on Life

“The only thing that isn’t worthless: to live this life out truthfully and rightly. And be patient with those who don’t.”
– Marcus Aurelius

Marcus Aurelius on Mortality and the Key to Living Fully

A Case for Solitude and Stillness

When you surround yourself with moments of solitude and stillness, you become intimately familiar with your environment in a way that forced stimulation doesn’t allow. The world becomes richer, the layers start to peel back, and you see things for what they really are, in all their wholeness, in all their contradictions, and in all their unfamiliarity.

The Most Important Skill Nobody Taught You