Ask Yourself Honestly

“Ask yourself honestly: are you looking for a steady, predictable life? Is this what you want? If so, you must realize that the world cannot offer you this. Everything in the world is in the process of change. Nothing is steady. Nothing is predictable. Nothing will give you anything other than temporary security. Toughts come and go. Relationships begin and end. Bodies are born and pass away. This is all the world can offer you: impermanence, growth, change.”
— Paul Ferrini

From the book Love Without Conditions

A 1,000 km walk along the Nakasendō

Kissa by Kissa: How to Walk Japan (Book One) is a book about walking 1,000+km of the countryside of Japan along the ancient Nakasendō highway, the culture of toast (toast!), and mid-twentieth century Japanese cafés called kissaten.

Not sure what I should congratulate Craig Mod more on: His new book or the fact that he built a Kickstarter like engine in Shopify and open sourced it.

Intentional Integrity

A few weeks ago I had the pleasure to hear Robert Chestnut present some of the ideas in his brand new book Intentional Integrity. What he was saying resonated so deeply with me. As someone who cares about workplace culture I can not wait to read this.

Don’t Complain

“Sister, there are people who went to sleep all over the world last night, poor and rich and white and black, but they will never wake again. Sister, those who expected to rise did not, their beds became their cooling boards, and their blankets became their winding sheets. And those dead folks would give anything, anything at all for just five minutes of this weather or ten minutes of that plowing that person was grumbling about. So you watch yourself about complaining, Sister. What you’re supposed to do when you don’t like a thing is change it. If you can’t change it, change the way you think about it. Don’t complain.”
Maya Angelou

Code of Morals

“When the accumulation of wealth is no longer of high social importance, there will be great changes in the code of morals. We shall be able to rid ourselves of many of the pseudo-moral principles which have hag-ridden us for two hundred years, by which we have exalted some of the most distasteful of human qualities into the position of the highest virtues. We shall be able to afford to dare to assess the money-motive at its true value. The love of money as a possession — as distinguished from the love of money as a means to the enjoyments and realities of life — will be recognized for what it is, a somewhat disgusting morbidity, one of those semi-criminal, semi-pathological propensities which one hands over with a shudder to the specialists in mental disease.”
― John Maynard Keynes

Economic Possibilities for Our Grandchildren

Revolutionary Love

“Revolutionary love is a well-spring of care, an awakening to the inherent dignity and beauty of others and the earth, a quieting of the ego, a way of moving through the world in relationship, asking: ‘What is your story? What is at stake? What is my part in your flourishing?’ Loving others, even our opponents, in this way has the power to sustain political, social and moral transformation. This is how love changes the world.”
— Valarie Kaur

Bookshop

Bookshop is an online bookstore with a mission to financially support local, independent bookstores. Here’s your alternative to buying books on Amazon! Yes, please!

What We See When We Read

Love this animated trailer for Peter Mendelsund’s best selling book “What We See When We Read“, illustrated by Brian Rea.

On Quitting

“Here’s a quote from ultramarathoner Dick Collins: Decide before the race the conditions that will cause you to stop and drop out. You don’t want to be out there saying, ‘Well gee, my leg hurts, I’m a little dehydrated, I’m sleepy, I’m tired, and it’s cold and windy.’ And talk yourself into quitting. If you are making a decision based on how you feel at that moment, you will probably make the wrong decision.”
— Seth Godin, THE DIP

(via)

Whatever arises…

“Whatever arises, love that.”
— Matt Kahn

This book is rocking my world.

Our Presence

“The world needs our immediate presence.”
— Louise Penny, paraphrasing Miguel Cervantes

From How Time is On Your Side, by Bridget Watson Payne

Thank you Body

Thank you body,
for teaching me how to love, me
for showing me my deepest depths
also my soft light
for holding me even when I am
kicking and screaming.
thank you body,
for giving me permission
and the courage
to keep showing up
to keep saying yes.

— Maribeth Helen Keane

Practices in listening

“Do not ask your children
to strive for extraordinary lives.
Such striving may seem admirable,
but it is the way of foolishness.
Help them instead to find the wonder
and the marvel of an ordinary life.
Show them the joy of tasting
tomatoes, apples and pears.
Show them how to cry
when pets and people die.
Show them the infinite pleasure
in the touch of a hand.
And make the ordinary come alive for them.
The extraordinary will take care of itself.”
― William Martin

From the book: The Parent’s Tao Te Ching: Ancient Advice for Modern Parents

Dome Bookends

Yes please.

This Could Be Our Future

Yancey Strickler wrote a book and I can not wait to read it. The book’s main message is speaking to my heart, showing a vision for building a society that looks beyond money and toward maximizing the values that make life worth living. YES!

Modern Manners

YES! The School of Life Guide to Modern Manners!

Science Of Persuasion

This animated video describes the six universal Principles of Persuasion that have been scientifically proven to make you most effective as reported in Dr. Cialdini’s groundbreaking book, Influence.

Activist: Portraits of Courage

Activist: Portraits of Courage caught my attention. Love that quote especially.

How To Overcome your Childhood

This book caught my attention: How To Overcome your Childhood. Topics include:

– Emotional Inheritance (How emotional problems are handed down from parent to child)
– The Golden Child Syndrome (How too much love from our parents can be just as damaging as too little)
– Over-Achievement (How we compensate for emotional neglect through worldly success)
– Splitting (How we fail to reconcile between the good and bad aspects of our parents)
– Soothing (How we still require the kinds of affection we received as children)
– Becoming an Adult (How recognising our immaturity is the key to growth)

Root, Nurture, Grow

I spent most of yesterday reading this book, The Essential Guide to Propagating Houseplants by Caro Langton. And now all I want to do is make plant babies! How was your Sunday?

Library Goals

This photo of Karl Lagerfeld’s library had me gasp. GOALS!

Small Pleasures

Small Pleasures is a book to guide us to the best of life’s small pleasures: everything from the distinctive delight of holding a child’s hand to the enjoyment of disagreeing with someone, to the joy of the evening sky; an intriguing, evocative mix of small pleasures that will heighten our senses and return us to the world with new-found excitement and enthusiasm.

The world needs this.

Escher-esque Chinese Bookstore

Mirrored ceilings and criss-crossed stairwells give this Chinese bookstore the feeling of an M.C. Escher Woodcut. Wow!

The Great Mental Models Project

This new book by Farnam Street covers the first 9 mental models that we refer to as the General Thinking Concepts. A thorough understanding of these will improve the way you approach problems, consider opportunities, and make difficult decisions.

The Great Mental Models is a project by Farnam Street to help equalize opportunity in the world by making a high-quality education free and available to everyone.

Their newsletter is one of my favorites. Always super thoughtful and thought provoking. You can sign up here.