Missing From Your Job Description

– Add energy to every conversation
– Ask why
– Find obsolete things on your task list and remove them
– Treat customers better than they expect
– Offer to help co-workers before they ask
– Feed the plants
– Leave things more organized than you found them
– Invent a moment of silliness
– Highlight good work from your peers
– Find other great employees to join the team
– Cut costs
– Help invent a new product or service that people really want
– Get smarter at your job through training or books
– Encourage curiosity
– Surface and highlight difficult decisions
– Figure out what didn’t work
– Organize the bookshelf
– Start a club
– Tell a joke at no one’s expense
– Smile a lot.

As someone who runs companies with a high level of trust and as someone who cares about people stepping into their own, this list of missing items from your job description makes my heart sing. Thank you Seth Godin.

What you Resist, Persists

I saw this in Jocelyn’s Newsletter today. Blogged it. Then realized that she found it on my blog. Full circle. LOVE.

Don’t Close Your Heart

“Do not let anything that happens in life be important enough that you’re willing to close your heart over it.”
Michael A. Singer

The Perogative of Adulthood

“We aren’t in relationships to suffer in silence or fury; we may have come from unhappy muzzled childhoods, but it is the prerogative of adulthood to be able to complain; we simply need to give ourselves the space and compassion to learn to do so successfully, which means, with an absence of sarcasm or rage.”

How to Complain So a Partner Will Listen

Greatness

“There is no greatness where there is no simplicity, goodness and truth.”
Leo Tolstoy

Crisis

“Crisis takes place when the old has not died and the new has still not been born.”
– Bertolt Brecht

From my current favorite Instagram account / website called Nitch.

My Own Self

“I am the architect of my own self, my own character and destiny. It is no use whingeing about what I might have been, I am the things I have done and nothing more.”
Jean-Paul Sartre

Beginning

“The beginning is the most important part of the work.” – – Plato

How We End Things

“If you can change one thing about yourself then please be kinder and change how you end things because it matters way more than how you begin them.”
– Sartaj Anand

How We End Things, by Sartaj Anand

The Tickle of a Feather

“If you’re open to learning, you get your life-lessons delivered as gently as the tickle of a feather. But if you’re defensive, if you stubbornly persist in being right instead of learning the lesson at hand, if you stop paying attention to the tickles, the nudges, the clues—boom! Sledgehammer.”
― Gay Hendricks

From the book The First Rule of Ten: A Tenzing Norbu Mystery

Beer Can

“This seems to be an era of gratuitous inventions and negative improvements. Consider the beer can. It was beautiful – as beautiful as the clothespin, as inevitable as the wine bottle, as dignified and reassuring as the fire hydrant. A tranquil cylinder of delightfully resonant metal, it could be opened in an instant, requiring only the application of a handy gadget freely dispensed by every grocer. Who can forget the small, symmetrical thrill of those two triangular punctures, the dainty pfff, the little crest of suds that foamed eagerly in the exultation of release? Now we are given, instead, a top beetling with an ugly, shmoo-shaped tab, which, after fiercely resisting the tugging, bleeding fingers of the thirsty man, threatens his lips with a dangerous and hideous hole. However, we have discovered a way to thwart Progress, usually so unthwartable. Turn the beer can upside down and open the bottom. The bottom is still the way the top used to be. True, this operation gives the beer an unsettling jolt, and the sight of a consistently inverted beer can might make people edgy, not to say queasy. But the latter difficulty could be eliminated if manufacturers would design cans that looked the same whichever end was up, like playing cards. What we need is Progress with an escape hatch.”
Jon Updike

Originally appeared in The New Yorker (Jan. 18, 1964).

(via Clay)

Several Kinds of Love

“There are several kinds of love. One is a selfish, mean, grasping, egotistical thing which uses love for self-improtance. This is the ugly and crippling kind. The other is an outpouring of everything good in you – of kindness and consideration and respect – not only the social respect of manners but the greater respect which is recognition of another person as unique and valuable. The first kind can make you sick and small and weak but the second can release in you strength, and courage and goodness and even wisdom you didn’t know you had.”
John Steinbeck

Read the full letter. It’s delightful.

Do Not Choose The Lesser Life

Nayyirah Waheed’s poems get me in heart. Always.

Creativity

“Creativity is the greatest rebellion in existence.”
– Osho

The End Goal

“The goal isn’t credit. The goal is change.”
– Seth Godin

When your ideas get stolen.

How To Email Busy People

“If you want a meeting, ask for a meeting. Provide some time options and ask for a specified length. If you want an introduction, ask for an introduction. If you’re looking for funding, tell him you’re currently fundraising and ask to meet to show him your pitch. Don’t be sly. Don’t hint. Make the process ridiculously easy by just asking for what you want.”

How to email busy people, by Jason Freedman

Collateral Damage

“Sometimes we are just the collateral damage in someone else’s war against themselves.”
Lauren Eden

Future of Content

“The future of content, in my opinion, is all about creating context. We are bombarded with so much information from so many channels every single day, that people crave editorial that can actually help them make sense of everything. We get so much of our “content” in these little bursts now — be it an email, a tweet, a blog post. But it’s always this little bite-sized, isolated bit of information. We rarely understand how it actually fits into our lives.

Given this, I think what’s needed are curators, editors, writers, filmmakers, etc who can really zoom out from that narrow perspective and take the long view. Who can do some of that sense-making for people so that they understand how this political development fits into the long arc of history, or how developing this particular habit will give their life more meaning in the long run. The future of content is about creating a rich, well-thought-out context that makes it possible for people to really process and synthesize ideas in depth — not in this surface-y way we’re all accustomed to now.”

– Jocelyn K. Glei

This interview with my friend Jocelyn really made me think.

Honesty

“Honesty always gets my attention. Not particularly someone who is honest to me, but someone who is honest with themselves.”
– Heath Ledger

(via Nitch)

Ideas You Consume

“What you think is a function of the ideas you consume.”
Faris

Excellent read: How to balance your media diet.

The Love You Put Into Something

“I strongly believe that the amount of love and care you put into a project is always apparent. Even if people are not conscious of it, they can sense when you have paid attention to every little detail.”
– Jocelyn K. Glei

I wholeheartedly agree with Jocelyn. Read the full interview.

The World

“The world needs the sense that we are all in it TOGETHER!”
– Jean Houston

Every Opportunity Comes with a Cost

“As much as we’d like to be nice people, we owe others a lot less of our time than we believe we do. It’s your business, you’re allowed to be a little selfish with it, especially when the net result of saying “yes” to everything to be “nice” is that you have less time to actually spend on your business and serving your customers.”
Paul Jarvis

(via my favorite newsletter)

Experience Without Fighting

“Let go of the battle. Breathe quietly and let it be. Let your body relax and your heart soften. Open to whatever you experience without fighting.”
― Jack Kornfield