The Loss of Chance Meetings

I am feeling this Tweet (and the responses) on the loss of chance meetings by going remote. I personally thrive on the unstructured, serendipitous meetings. Trying to figure out how to create them in a remote context, some folks seem to believe it’s possible.

David Bowie in 1983 Asking for More Black Artists on MTV



(via John Maeda)

Leading with Love

YES!

The Internal Work

(via Kai)

Expression of Love

“When you intentionally make the expression of love a part of your daily practice—that is feeling, receiving, and giving love—not only do you boost your immune system, but you begin to understand that the more you feel love, the more you become love, and when you become the embodiment of love, you can change the world.”
— Dr. Joe Dispenza

I Need To Do Better

Thank you for this gentle yet powerful call to action, Anisa Makhoul. I have to do better.

Black Lives Matter.

Towards a Moral Revolution

“One of the biggest lessons of my life, Krista, has been that we can’t separate the world into monsters and angels and that there’s nothing like loving people and knowing friends who played different roles in the genocide, including being perpetrators, that makes you have to confront that most raw element of what it means to be human. And the only conclusion I could make was that there are monsters and angels in each of us and that those monsters really are our broken parts — they’re our insecurities; they’re our fears; they’re our shames — and that in times of insecurity, it becomes really easy for demagogues to prey on those broken parts and sometimes make us do terrible things to each other.

We’re seeing that all over the world right now. And we have to fight against that. And that’s where the moral revolution becomes a matter of whether we choose to dive into the dark, the perilous path, or whether we choose to create a narrative and make that narrative real, which is our shared destiny, the possibility of collective human flourishment, our repairing the Earth in ways that make it more beautiful — and the choice is ours. And so my hard-edged hope comes from having lived and worked in communities that have had to contend with both. And like flowers breaking through granite, I’m gonna choose hope every time. And I frankly — despite all the dark, I remain a stubborn, persistent, hard-edged, hopeful optimist. I do!”

This is an excerpt of a conversation between Jacqueline Novogratz and Krista Tippett in the most recent episode of the wonderful On Being podcast. Listening to this episode is what my heart needed today.

The Need for A Cry

The School of Life is making a case for a good cry.

68 Bits of Unsolicited Advice

Love these 68 Bits of Unsolicited Advice by Kevin Kelly. You can read them here.

A Hill You Are Willing To Die On

This thread made me laugh. And nod my head in agreement.

Until There Was Nothing

Until There Was Nothing

…or “How I Learned To Stop Worrying And Love The Black Hole”

Someday this will pass and there will be nothing left. The inevitable spaghettification of it all. That’s not something to fear “because we come from nothing” as Alan Watts puts it… and from nothing comes something new! By Paul Trillo

What Do You Love Me For?

Gate A-4

Wandering around the Albuquerque Airport Terminal, after learning
my flight had been delayed four hours, I heard an announcement:
“If anyone in the vicinity of Gate A-4 understands any Arabic, please
come to the gate immediately.”

Well—one pauses these days. Gate A-4 was my own gate. I went there.

An older woman in full traditional Palestinian embroidered dress, just
like my grandma wore, was crumpled to the floor, wailing. “Help,”
said the flight agent. “Talk to her. What is her problem? We
told her the flight was going to be late and she did this.”

I stooped to put my arm around the woman and spoke haltingly.
“Shu-dow-a, Shu-bid-uck Habibti? Stani schway, Min fadlick, Shu-bit-
se-wee?” The minute she heard any words she knew, however poorly
used, she stopped crying. She thought the flight had been cancelled
entirely. She needed to be in El Paso for major medical treatment the
next day. I said, “No, we’re fine, you’ll get there, just later, who is
picking you up? Let’s call him.”

We called her son, I spoke with him in English. I told him I would
stay with his mother till we got on the plane and ride next to
her. She talked to him. Then we called her other sons just
for the fun of it. Then we called my dad and he and she spoke for a while
in Arabic and found out of course they had ten shared friends. Then I
thought just for the heck of it why not call some Palestinian poets I know
and let them chat with her? This all took up two hours.

She was laughing a lot by then. Telling of her life, patting my knee,
answering questions. She had pulled a sack of homemade mamool
cookies—little powdered sugar crumbly mounds stuffed with dates and
nuts—from her bag—and was offering them to all the women at the gate.
To my amazement, not a single woman declined one. It was like a
sacrament. The traveler from Argentina, the mom from California, the
lovely woman from Laredo—we were all covered with the same powdered
sugar. And smiling. There is no better cookie.

And then the airline broke out free apple juice from huge coolers and two
little girls from our flight ran around serving it and they
were covered with powdered sugar, too. And I noticed my new best friend—
by now we were holding hands—had a potted plant poking out of her bag,
some medicinal thing, with green furry leaves. Such an old country tradi-
tion. Always carry a plant. Always stay rooted to somewhere.

And I looked around that gate of late and weary ones and I thought, This
is the world I want to live in. The shared world. Not a single person in that
gate—once the crying of confusion stopped—seemed apprehensive about
any other person. They took the cookies. I wanted to hug all those other women, too.

This can still happen anywhere. Not everything is lost.

Naomi Shihab Nye

(via Julie)

12 Principles for Prototyping a Feminist Business

Framework for the practical application of the tenants of the feminine economy:

1. You have a body.
2. You are connected with the earth, the plants, and all living beings.
3. Integrate!
4. Institutionalize empathy: Build frameworks that support feelings.
5. Embody your values.
6. Reclaim happinesss: New definitions of success.
7. Consider everything an experiment.
8. Free yourself from the myth of the meritocracy.
9. Tell the truth.
10. Cultivate abundance.
111. A business can be a healing for yourself & others.

A holistic vision for a new economic paradigm, founded on feminine and feminist principles. By Jennifer Armbrust.

Questions to Consult For Major Purchases

Next time you buy anything, ask yourself these questions:

1. Can I work around the problem with a repair, modification, or change in use?
2. If I buy this, what else am I not buying?
3. Can I afford this?
4. Will this item help me do things I can’t do now?
5. Will buying this item significantly increase my enjoyment of X?
6. How often will I use this in the next year? In the next five years?
7.Will this item become obsolete in the near term?
8. Is this item repairable?
9,Do I really need ‘the best’? What is a good second choice?
10. Can I buy something used that will do the job?
11. Am I supporting a business I know and like? Do our values align?

From this article: Buy less, do more with good enough gear.

(via Dense Discovery, currently hands-down my favorite newsletter)

Stimulus [ ] Response

(via Chris)

A Message of Hope From Neil Gaiman

Would you call your kid Omelette?

This Twitter thread is giving me life.

Together Apart

Priya Parker launched a podcast, Together Apart, in collaboration with The New York Times. If there is one voice I want to hear from, about the meaning of gathering in this unusual time, it is Priya.

About this episode: A woman who has been gathering for Passover Seder with over 40 people for 40 years wants to know how to celebrate digitally without losing the intimacy. Priya helps her design a meaningful digital gathering by exploring one of the most important questions from the Passover tradition — what makes this night different from all other nights?

If you haven’t read Priya’s book, The Art of Gathering, I highly recommend.

Meaningful Gatherings in this Time

Priya Parker shares tips on how to approach and reframe how we gather in this strange time of social distancing.

The Great Ones

“The great ones do not set up offices, charge fees, give lectures, or write books. Wisdom is silent, and the most effective propaganda for truth is the force of personal example. The great ones attract disciples, lesser figures whose mission is to preach and to teach. These are gospelers who, unequal to the highest task, spend their lives in converting others. The great ones are indifferent, in the profoundest sense. They don’t ask you to believe: they electrify you by their behavior. They are the awakeners. What you do with your petty life is of no concern to them. What you do with your life is only of concern to you, they seem to say. In short, their only purpose here on earth is to inspire. And what more can one ask of a human being than that?”
— Henry Miller

Thin Slices of Anxiety


From Catherine Lepage’s Thin Slices of Anxiety.

Absurd Times

I feel this.

Stay Home

Starting tomorrow all schools are closed in NYC. For weeks, if not months.

Wow! I can’t help but feel as if the earth is resetting itself.

So many are suffering, but I also see so much humanity in action. People opening their hearts and helping each other, finding moments of joy.

Humans are resilient. We will be ok. All will be ok. But for now, let’s stay home.