Culture

“A single change can happen overnight, but nothing is going to suddenly transform culture. Culture is cumulative—it’s composed of all previous decisions made by a group of people. Bit by bit, a company can make different trade-offs, and over time, this is how culture turns around.”

Greg McKeown in this article.

(via Bailey)

How Emotions Are Made

“Utka Eskimos have no concept of “Anger.” The Tahitians have no concept of “Sadness.” This last item is very difficult for Westerners to accept… life without sadness? Really? When Tahitians are in a situation that a Westerner would describe as sad, they feel ill, troubled, fatigued, or unenthusiastic, all of which are covered by their broader term pe’ape’a.”

From How Emotions Are Made: The Secret Life of the Brain, via an article on New Neuroscience Reveals 3 Secrets That Will Make You Emotionally Intelligent

Why 2017 Is Filled With Jerks

“Research shows that technology has increased the “asshole problem,” as Sutton puts it, because people are much more likely to be mean if they don’t have to make eye contact.”

This Stanford Professor Has a Theory on Why 2017 Is Filled With Jerks, by Jessica Pressler

Just Go Fucking Do It

‘I wish you luck, and stubbornness, and the absence of the need for a permission slip from anybody. Just go fucking do it.’
– Elizabeth Gilbert

Via this interview with Rachel Khong on okreal.co

This

“Céline and Colin are representative of a massive shift that is happening in which companies are no longer measuring success solely by how much money they can make, but also by the scope of their positive human impact.”

Taken from this article.

Frank Chimero on Community

“Community is critical for creative folks because creating the work is so inwardly focused. … Participating in a community becomes a way to let some sympathetic people into your process so you don’t go crazy, while still protecting the work in its unfinished and fragile state. I see community as people working parallel to one another, sharing information and resources freely with each other. This is how useful information spreads around and how creative people find new opportunities.”
– Frank Chimero

Read the full post: Back to The Cave

Pleasure vs Happiness

“A life that doesn’t include hard-won accomplishment and triumph over obstacles may not be a satisfying one. There is something deeply fulfilling — even thrilling — in doing almost anything difficult extremely well. There is a joy and pride that come from pushing yourself to another level or across a new frontier. A life devoted only to the present — to feeling good in the now — is unlikely to deliver real fulfillment. The present moment by itself it too small, too hollow. We all need a future. Something beyond and greater than our own present gratification, at which to aim or feel we’ve contributed.” 
— The Triple Package

Found in this article: If It Doesn’t Suck, It’s Not Worth Doing

Pain

“The pain is a kind of challenge your mind presents — will you learn how to focus and move past boredom, or like a child will you succumb to the need for immediate pleasure and distraction?” 
— Robert Greene

Found in this article: If It Doesn’t Suck, It’s Not Worth Doing

Uncertainty

“The greatest creators train not only in their chosen fields, but in the alchemy of fear.”
– Jonathan Fields

From this interview in which Jonathan talks about his book from 2012 on Uncertainty.

A few Words of Advice for Brain Pickers

There’s no such thing as a 15 minute call, or coffee, or meeting with someone you don’t really know.

I keep coming back to this article by Jason Fried

Go Offline To Read

This is clever: You have to go off-line to read this article.

Algorithmic Engagement

I have daily conversations with friends and peers about how much we all dislike the algorithms on Twitter and Facebook. I have yet to find someone who argues that these changes improved the experience. As someone who creates digital products myself, I am heartbroken how Algorithmic Engagement is now ruling our online experience. Call me idealistic, but I don’t think every decision should be driven by the bottom line. Here’s an idea: Respect User > Profits.

This article on the topic is quite sobering: This Is How Your Fear and Outrage Are Being Sold for Profit, by Tobias Rose-Stockwell

(via)

Screen Time

“There’s not a single exception. All screen activities are linked to less happiness, and all nonscreen activities are linked to more happiness.”

Have Smartphones Destroyed a Generation?

To Stay Married, Embrace Change

“Nostalgia, which fuels our resentment toward change, is a natural human impulse. And yet being forever content with a spouse, or a street, requires finding ways to be happy with different versions of that person or neighborhood.”

To Stay Married, Embrace Change, by Ada Calhoun

Rejecting Standard Metrics

“System innovations almost always involve rejecting the standard metrics as a first step in making a difference. When you measure the same metrics, you’re likely to create the same outcomes. But if you can see past the metrics to the results, it’s possible to change the status quo.”
– Seth Godin

Instead of the easy numbers…

Life

“Life can disappear on us just like a cup of coffee consumed on autopilot. In other words, to really experience life itself, as opposed to just more thinking about life, we need to remember we’re having an experience.”

The Alternative To Thinking All The Time

Life

“Life is a good teacher and a good friend. Things are always in transition, if we could only realize it. Nothing ever sums itself up in the way that we like to dream about. The off-center, in-between state is an ideal situation, a situation in which we don’t get caught and we can open our hearts and minds beyond limit. It’s a very tender, nonaggressive, open-ended state of affairs.”

When Things Fall Apart: Tibetan Buddhist Nun and Teacher Pema Chödrön on Transformation Through Difficult Times

Your Three Feet of Influence

“We can be the kind of people who lead with their hearts and behave to those around them in an ethical, honest, and kindly manner that creates for those who enter that three feet around us a feeling of peace that also serves to steady the self.”

Your Three Feet of Influence, by Sharon Salzberg.

Choosing Profit

“Having a profitable business doesn’t mean squeezing the lemon for every last bitter drop. It isn’t all or nothing. You can be profitable and generous. Profitable and fair. Profitable and kind. These aren’t opposite ends of some moral spectrum. Quite the contrary.”

Why we choose profit, by Jason Fried

John Maeda’s 4 Rules

1. Don’t speak ill of others.

2. Avoid passive aggressive behavior.

3. Listen broadly, but don’t waffle on decisions.

4. When in error — admit, apologize, move forward.

– John Maeda

Read some of John Maeda’s explanations on his Four Rules

Phones

“We are addicted to our phones not because we rely on them, but to the extent that we recruit them to a harmful project of self-avoidance. They do not mean to hurt us. But we may – and probably do – use them to injure ourselves. Addiction sounds horrible. But it is a hard name for a normal inclination: a habit of running away from the joys and terrors of self-knowledge.”

How to Live More Wisely Around Our Phones

Enough

“The longest lived businesses in the world aren’t the ones that were biggest in their day. Many of them are family firms, or small to mid-sized enterprises content with steady evolvement of their niche. Content with enough.”

Enough by DHH

This Article

“I don’t know how to explain to someone why they should care about other people.”

I just kept nodding my head in agreement while reading this article by Kayla Chadwick.

How do you draw a circle?

Analysis suggests that the way you draw a simple circle is linked to geography and cultural upbringing, deep-rooted in hundreds of years of written language, and significant in developmental psychology and trends in education today. Fascinating article!

(thanks Christine)