Rejecting Standard Metrics

“System innovations almost always involve rejecting the standard metrics as a first step in making a difference. When you measure the same metrics, you’re likely to create the same outcomes. But if you can see past the metrics to the results, it’s possible to change the status quo.”
– Seth Godin

Instead of the easy numbers…

Life

“Life can disappear on us just like a cup of coffee consumed on autopilot. In other words, to really experience life itself, as opposed to just more thinking about life, we need to remember we’re having an experience.”

The Alternative To Thinking All The Time

Life

“Life is a good teacher and a good friend. Things are always in transition, if we could only realize it. Nothing ever sums itself up in the way that we like to dream about. The off-center, in-between state is an ideal situation, a situation in which we don’t get caught and we can open our hearts and minds beyond limit. It’s a very tender, nonaggressive, open-ended state of affairs.”

When Things Fall Apart: Tibetan Buddhist Nun and Teacher Pema Chödrön on Transformation Through Difficult Times

Your Three Feet of Influence

“We can be the kind of people who lead with their hearts and behave to those around them in an ethical, honest, and kindly manner that creates for those who enter that three feet around us a feeling of peace that also serves to steady the self.”

Your Three Feet of Influence, by Sharon Salzberg.

Choosing Profit

“Having a profitable business doesn’t mean squeezing the lemon for every last bitter drop. It isn’t all or nothing. You can be profitable and generous. Profitable and fair. Profitable and kind. These aren’t opposite ends of some moral spectrum. Quite the contrary.”

Why we choose profit, by Jason Fried

John Maeda’s 4 Rules

1. Don’t speak ill of others.

2. Avoid passive aggressive behavior.

3. Listen broadly, but don’t waffle on decisions.

4. When in error — admit, apologize, move forward.

– John Maeda

Read some of John Maeda’s explanations on his Four Rules

Phones

“We are addicted to our phones not because we rely on them, but to the extent that we recruit them to a harmful project of self-avoidance. They do not mean to hurt us. But we may – and probably do – use them to injure ourselves. Addiction sounds horrible. But it is a hard name for a normal inclination: a habit of running away from the joys and terrors of self-knowledge.”

How to Live More Wisely Around Our Phones

Enough

“The longest lived businesses in the world aren’t the ones that were biggest in their day. Many of them are family firms, or small to mid-sized enterprises content with steady evolvement of their niche. Content with enough.”

Enough by DHH

This Article

“I don’t know how to explain to someone why they should care about other people.”

I just kept nodding my head in agreement while reading this article by Kayla Chadwick.

How do you draw a circle?

Analysis suggests that the way you draw a simple circle is linked to geography and cultural upbringing, deep-rooted in hundreds of years of written language, and significant in developmental psychology and trends in education today. Fascinating article!

(thanks Christine)

Human Stupidity

Interesting read: The five universal laws of human stupidity, by Corinne Purtill.

(via Adam)

What 99% looks like

“Shun the non-believers and ship your work.”
– Seth Godin

What 99% looks like

Questions To Get To Know Someone

This post has LOTS of questions that help you get to know someone. Here are three that caught my eye:

What have you created that you are most proud of?

What do you value in a friendship?

What question do you always want to ask people but don’t have the courage to ask?

(via)

Deep Work

“The ability to perform deep work is becoming increasingly rare at exactly the same time it is becoming increasingly valuable in our economy. As a consequence, the few who cultivate this skill, and then make it the core of their working life, will thrive.”
– Cal Newport

From the book Deep Work: Rules for Focused Success in a Distracted World, via this post.

Change

“When you change the way you look at things, the things you look at change.”
— Max Planck

From this article.

Avoiding Organizational Debt

“…, organizational debt is the accumulation of changes that leaders should have made but didn’t.”

Avoiding Organizational Debt, by Scott Belsky

Communal Groupthink

“Most of our views are shaped by communal groupthink rather than individual rationality, and we cling to these views because of group loyalty. Bombarding people with facts and exposing their individual ignorance is likely to backfire. Most people don’t like too many facts, and they certainly don’t like to feel stupid.”

People Have Limited Knowledge. What’s the Remedy? Nobody Knows, by Yuval Harari

(via Bailey)

Rules for Making Memorable Connections

1. Convey genuine appreciation.
2. Listen with intent.
3. Use humility markers
4. Offer unvarnished honesty.
5. Blue-sky brainstorm.

How to Become Insanely Well-Connected, by Chris Fralic

Calling In versus Calling Out

“I picture ‘calling in’ as a practice of pulling folks back in who have strayed from us. It means extending to ourselves the reality that we will and do fuck up, we stray, and there will always be a chance for us to return. Calling in as a practice of loving each other enough to allow each other to make mistakes, a practice of loving ourselves enough to know that what we’re trying to do here is a radical unlearning of everything we have been configured to believe is normal.”
– Ngọc Loan Trần

Calling In: A Quick Guide on When and How

(via lisa)

Don’t Be a Crehater

“Good creators don’t talk shit about their fellow creators. They champion the work of those around them. They know how hard this stuff is. They accept that stumbles are part of what we do. And they treat one another with respect—because we all deserve that.”
– Eric Karjaluoto

Important read: Don’t Be a Crehater

(via Chad)

Promises

“Promises are like debt — they accrue interest. The longer you wait to fulfill them, the more they cost to pay off.”
– Jason Fried

Don’t Promise, by Jason Fried

Brandord Marsalis on Students

From this article: 3 Things School taught you without even realizing it.

(via)

How to Raise a Creative Child

“Creativity may be hard to nurture, but it’s easy to thwart. By limiting rules, parents encouraged their children to think for themselves. They tended to “place emphasis on moral values, rather than on specific rules,” the Harvard psychologist Teresa Amabile reports.”

How to Raise a Creative Child. Step One: Back Off, by Adam Grant

On Measuring

“What gets measured gets managed.”
– Peter Drucker

A quote found in this blog post. (via)